Event Archive

Importance of Employee Handbooks and HR Audits

   

A good employee handbook can clearly ellucidate employee expectations, helping to prevent and mitigate future disciplinary and even legal actions. The same can be said for the difficult but sensible HR Audit process.

In this information-packed webinar Roxana E. Verano, Esq. of the Landegger Baron Law Group explained the steps needed for both tasks.

Contact Info

Landegger Baron Law Group

Roxana E. Verano, Esq.

Roxana@landeggeresq.com

115760 Ventura Blvd., Suite 1200
Encino, California 91436
(818) 986-7561

NOVATIME TECHNOLOGY, INC.

Scott Rose, Enterprise Sales

scott.rose@novatime.com

1440 Bridgegate Dr., Suite 300
Diamond Bar, California 91765
(909) 895-8100 ext. 152

Questions & Answers:

Q1

Is it good to have all policies on employee website instead of handbook?

A1

This is certainly an option. However, an actual, physical handbook has the advantage of being able to be signed by employees, creating physical evidence that the handbook as provided to the employee.

Q2

What kind of disciplinary action can I do when an employee takes longer breaks and more than 2 breaks a day?

A2

The specifics of disciplinary actions and what is allowed may vary depending on state and locality, and it would be best to either contact me or other legal counsel to discuss this matter further. Just be sure to be consistent and spell-out disciplinary actions in the Employee Handbook!

Q3

If employee is being paid and accident happens to them or they cause accident off premise - how does that fair for employer? Isn't it ok to ask employee to stay on premise during paid break time?

A3

During 10-minute paid breaks, you may require employees to remain in premise, but must ensure that they are relieved of ALL work duties.

Q4

Can I actually terminate someone who takes longer breaks after 3 incidents?

A4

You may if your State and Local law does not restrict this. If you are in a right to work state, this would definitely be allowed. It is always the best policy to.

Q5

Is it a 10-minute break after 4 hours of work or a 15-minute break?

A5

In California, the rule is a 10-minute break after 3.5 hours of work. Please review your local rules if not in California.

Q6

How do you suggest to get all employees acknowledgement? Does email read receipt work? Anything else you can suggest for many locations?

A6

The best manner to ensure and prove employee acknowledgment is through a written signature attached to the employee handbook.

Q7

Should hourly employees clock out for lunch?

A7

Yes, hourly employees do need to clock out for lunch, unless it may be proven that their job requires them to maintain work, in which case they may be provided with a “working lunch period”, where they are on the clock, and may still be required to perform duties, but needs enough autonomy to eat.

Q8

On the Non Exempt employee meal period, is this law that they must take a meal before the end of the 5th hour?

A8

It is in California, check with your local state and municipal law to see what rules apply to you.

Q9

How do you suggest to handle exempt employees who don't take lunch breaks?

A9

The important thing is, no matter what the policy is, to be consistent and clearly lay out expectations. Once this is done and an employee refuses to comply with the policy, appropriate punishment may be administered. For first offenses, and written or verbal warning is common, with further offenses increasing in severity.